Notorious Fitness Myths And The Counter Facts

in Pain

To pursue any goal or objective, you need to understand and know the things you need to do. Another factor that is equally important is the knowledge of the things that you need to avoid during your venture. Therefore, the knowledge of do’s and don’ts is of equal importance pertaining to pursuing any particular goal.

Pertaining to health and fitness where you can find facts there are myths as well that have become popular to the extent of being regarded as facts. Pursuing such myths diverts you from your goal and causes troubles during the path. The lines below give some popular fitness myths and the counter facts.

Targeted Fat Burn:

There are exercise and diet plans that promise targeting special areas of the body for fat burning. The fact is that there is no way in which you can control fat distribution across your body. Performing exercise can bring down your overall fat ratio, however, claiming that you can target fat burn is plainly false and has no rational grounds.

Empty Stomach Workout Is Bad:

Another strong myth prevalent pertaining to fitness is that you should not workout with empty stomach as in such a state body stores fats and burns muscles. The fact is quite contrary as the body turns towards fats stores as a secondary source of energy and starts burning them. Therefore, an empty stomach workout might actually help you burn more fats.

Pain Is Good:

People propagate the notion that pain is good and the more pain you feel during or after the workout the better job done. Having a little pain is good, but if the intensity of the pain increases and spreads to other areas instead of some specific muscle group, then such pain is not to be considered lightly. Such pain can easily turn into injury, which becomes a serious problem when considering achieving fitness goal.

Always Stretch Before Workout:

According to a recent research, stretching before the exercise might actually lead to muscles feeling weaker, thus undermining their actual workout potential. Therefore, the always stretch before workout statement does seem a myth now.

Lifting Heavy Bulks Up:

The common notion regarding weight training is that it causes you to bulk up. According to a recent study, people who lift heavier weights actually burn greater calories than those who lift lighter weights. Therefore, lifting heavy can help you burn fats and calories.

Treadmill and Running Outside Are Equal:

Different fitness enthusiasts also propagate the practice that running on treadmill is equally effective as running outside. The fact is that running outside is more effective because in the outside environment your body engages more muscles to cope up with uneven places or wind. Thus by running outside you burn more calories compared to running on treadmill which more stable and to your likings. Therefore, take safe and natural pre workout supplements and run in the park.

Sweating Is For Out Of Shape:

People think that those who are out of shape sweat more compared to fit people. The fact is on the contrary as people who are in shape have all their processes working to the optimal thus the sweat more compared to those who are out of shape.

Conclusion:

In a nutshell, before pursuing your fitness goal you need to conduct thorough research and find out the myths and realities pertaining to your fitness goal. The better understanding you have of the processes involved, the more effectively would you achieve the goal.

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Aimee Sparker has 15 articles online

Angelica Johnston is a health and fitness expert and works for Ultralifeshop that is the best online sports supplements store UK. The Company has excelled in making different health product for energy and endurance, bodybuilding, safe and natural pre workout supplements and healthy life in general

 

 

 

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Notorious Fitness Myths And The Counter Facts

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Notorious Fitness Myths And The Counter Facts

This article was published on 2013/10/28